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September 4, 1937

CERTAIN SIGNIFICANT ASPECTS OF CHILDHOOD TUBERCULOSIS: CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1937;109(10):753-755. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780360001001
Abstract

No other communicable disease equals tuberculosis in the taking of human lives. It probably exceeds all other diseases in individual and social importance, not so much from what it does to the child during the first infection but because of what it means to that individual during and after adolescence, when reinfection occurs. In a paper such as this it is impossible to consider all the many problems of childhood tuberculosis. A few of these problems will be discussed. The pathology of a first infection and the source of most reinfections are more clearly understood now than ever before. Just what constitutes resistance to the infection and how an individual develops immunity are controversial subjects at present. Early diagnostic signs are very indefinite and frequently missed, until there is evidence of extension of the disease. Much has been accomplished with regard to the cure of the disease, but more needs

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