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September 4, 1937

DISTURBANCE OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM IN NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY: CLINICAL LECTURE AT ATLANTIC CITY SESSION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Havard), Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1937;109(10):786-793. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.92780360002009
Abstract

In the study of the etiology of cardiovascular dysfunctions in general and of heart disease in particular, attention has been focused mainly on infectious and degenerative processes and on congenital malformations. Since cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death, and since in life the body comes in closest contact with environment through naurishment, the interrelation between the cardiovascular system and nutrition is a problem of primary importance. It is our purpose in this communication to describe nutritional factors that are responsible for abnormal function of the cardiovascular system. McCarrison1 sums up the nutritional origin of disease as follows: "... faulty food, faulty nutrition, faulty function, faulty structure, faulty health, disease." In certain nutritional states such a sequence of changes results in disease of the heart and of the blood vessels. Our present knowledge of these matters is meager, but the available clinical observations and experimental data suggest the

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