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Article
March 26, 1932

THE RELATIVE VALUE OF INORGANIC AND ORGANIC IRON IN HEMOGLOBIN FORMATION

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.

From the Department of Agricultural Chemistry, University of Wisconsin.

JAMA. 1932;98(13):1047-1050. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730390001001
Abstract

The magnitude of the literature that has been published concerning the metabolism of different forms of iron makes it impossible to attempt a complete review of the subject in this short paper. A discussion of much of the early work is also unnecessary in light of the more recently established facts, which lead to an explanation of much of the contradictory evidence presented in the earlier papers on hemoglobin formation. Those who believe that inorganic iron cannot be utilized and that only organic iron is available for hemoglobin formation find little support for their view in the recent work.

Experimental work in both laboratories and clinics has shown that inorganic iron salts when fed under proper conditions can be utilized for the synthesis of hemoglobin. In 1928 Hart, Steenbock, Waddell and Elvehjem1 demonstrated that inorganic iron, such as ferric chloride, when accompanied by traces of copper can be used

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