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September 18, 1937

CULTURE OF HUMAN MARROW: LENGTH OF LIFE OF THE NEUTROPHILS, EOSINOPHILS AND BASOPHILS OF NORMAL BLOOD AS DETERMINED BY COMPARATIVE CULTURES OF BLOOD AND STERNAL MARROW FROM HEALTHY PERSONS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Head of the Division of Experimental Medicine, University of Oregon Medical School PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Department of Medicine, University of Oregon Medical School.

JAMA. 1937;109(12):933-937. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780380017005
Abstract

The development of a simple method of culture of human marrow,1 by which actively motile mature neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils have been observed as late as fifty days after culture was started, suggested a new approach to the problem of the duration of life of the leukocytes of the blood.

That more data are needed on this question is indicated by the recent review of Garrey and Bryan,2 in which they stated: "The idea that leukocytes are very short lived and that their intravascular life is limited to hours or three or four days (Weiskotten, 1930) is undergoing modification." They then cited the literature on the duration of life of leukocytes which, on analysis, shows a complete lack of agreement, various authors finding durations of from four to twenty-eight days. Examination of this literature reveals that most of the conclusions were based either on experiments on animals3

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