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Article
March 26, 1932

A GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND RED BLOOD CELL COUNT RATIOS

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1932;98(13):1067-1069. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730390021004
Abstract

Few quantitative determinations of blood used in the clinic afford the same opportunity for cross checking of the accuracy of two methods as do the determinations of erythrocytes and of hemoglobin values, since in normal individuals the relationship between these values, usually referred to as the color index (Peters and Van Slyke1 color: count ratio) is constant. It follows that abnormal color index values are of significance only when it is certain that they are abnormal. In spite of this opportunity for constant checking of data without additional effort, the values for hemoglobin and for color index remain, in most hospitals, only of relative significance, and data accumulated in one clinic, in most instances, cannot be safely compared with data from another clinic. There are two primary reasons for this unsatisfactory condition in regard to unusually important clinical laboratory data. The first reason is the confusion arising from the

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