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Article
March 26, 1932

THE VALUE OF LIVER EXTRACT AND IRON IN THE ANEMIA OF YOUNG INFANTS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the St. Vincent's Infant and Maternity Hospital and the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute and the Department of Pathology, University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1932;98(13):1069-1072. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730390023005
Abstract

Anemia in infants, when not secondary to infections, in most cases must be due to a lack of (1) the mineral elements (inorganic elements), (2) the organic element, or (3) the food accessory substances necessary to bring about the utilization of 1 and 2 in the production of red cells and hemoglobin. This lack may be due to a shortage in supplies stored at birth and derived from the mother in utero or from an insufficient available quantity in the diet.

Anemia due to an exclusive milk diet in young animals, "milk anemia," is the form of experimental anemia most easily produced. This anemia in rats and rabbits is due to a lack of sufficient mineral elements in the diet. Steenbock and Hart1 have shown that iron and copper, the latter in traces only, when added to the milk, prevent or cure milk anemia.

A new-born infant, if born

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