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Article
April 9, 1932

STREPTOCOCCIC MENINGITIS: RECOVERY IN THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

Associate Visiting Physician, Bellevue Hospital; Bacteriologist, Research Laboratory, New York City Health Department; Instructor in Medicine, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College NEW YORK

From the Meningitis Division of the Research Laboratory, Department of Health.

JAMA. 1932;98(15):1253-1256. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730410017005
Abstract

Instances of recovery from streptococcic meningitis are exceedingly few. Kolmer1 states that the mortality of diffuse or generalized streptococcic meningitis is nearly 100 per cent, and also stresses the importance of radical forms of treatment in this dreadful disease. It seems, therefore, worth while to record three recoveries, particularly since all these patients were treated rather conservatively.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —J. P., a boy, aged 6 years, had a tonsillectomy performed, June 17, 1930. There was a slight hemorrhage from the left tonsillar fossa which required ligation. Shortly after the operation the child suddenly collapsed and became dyspneic and cyanotic. This condition, however, cleared up after a short interval. Several hours later the child became delirious and developed a fever of 103 F. There were no other symptoms at that time. June 18, the child began to complain of severe headache, had projectile vomiting, and the temperature

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