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Article
April 16, 1932

THE PATCH TEST AND THE ELEMENT OF SYRINGE CONTAMINATION: IN ARSPHENAMINE SENSITIZATION DERMATITIS

Author Affiliations

DALLAS, TEXAS

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Syphilis Clinic of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, John H. Stokes, M.D., director.

JAMA. 1932;98(16):1367-1372. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730420025009
Abstract

In a previous communication,1 it was pointed out that the percutaneous or patch test showed greater promise than either the intradermal or the scratch method in testing patients for hypersensitiveness to the arsphenamines. A review of the literature at that time showed that the intradermal test was not without danger. The skin of both man and animals has been sensitized to the arsphenamines by intradermal injection of the drug. Sensitization of normal skin does not occur with the patch test.

This paper includes a report of eight cases of arsphenamine dermatitis in which the patch test was successfully used as a guide to further treatment with the arsphenamines. All eight patients gave evidence of cutaneous intolerance to the arsphenamines, manifested by arsphenamine dermatitis.

Several papers have appeared in the American literature on this subject recently. Chargin, Sulzberger and Crowley2 reported positive reactions with the patch test in patients

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