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November 27, 1937

THE TREATMENT OF CORONARY SCLEROSIS AND ANGINA PECTORIS: BY PRODUCING A NEW BLOOD SUPPLY TO THE HEART

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the departments of Medicine and Surgery of the University Hospitals and the Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1937;109(22):1781-1786. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780480013003
Abstract

This report concerns the results obtained in the treatment of coronary artery sclerosis and intractable angina by grafting vascularized tissues on the heart. Up to the present time we have done this operation on twenty-five patients. A sufficiently long interval of time has elapsed since operation so that we can begin to evaluate the clinical results of this operation.

The experimental basis for this operation has been published.1 The anatomic arrangement of the heart and pericardium deserves some comment. Unlike any other organ, the heart is actually anchored in the body. It is anchored by the great veins and arteries and also by some fat, lymphatics and nerves that lie between these vessels. The fat at the base of the heart contains blood vessels that form anastomoses between the coronary arteries and other branches of the aorta, including the internal mammary, pericardial, phrenic, intercostal and esophageal.2 These anastomoses

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