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April 23, 1932

ANTITOXIC IMMUNITY RESULTING FROM ADMINISTRATION OF TOXIN BY MOUTH

Author Affiliations

From the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases.

JAMA. 1932;98(17):1436. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730430012004

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Abstract

The following experiments were made to learn whether or not ingestion of a sterile soluble toxin may stimulate the body to produce the corresponding antitoxin:

Persons were selected who gave no history of an attack of scarlet fever and who were susceptible to the

disease as shown by positive skin reactions following intradermal injection of one skin test dose of scarlet fever toxin. Sterile scarlet fever toxin from which the streptococci had been removed by filtration was administered by mouth in doses increasing from 4 cc. to 16 cc. of a toxin containing 50,000 skin test doses per cubic centimeter. Thus the amount of toxin administered in a single dose was increased from 200,000 to 800,000 skin test doses. The toxin was given once a day on successive days. It was taken without dilution and unaccompanied by water or other fluid at least two hours after the preceding meal and

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