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December 4, 1937

A NEW DIAGNOSTIC INTRADERMAL REACTION WITH BOWEL ANTIGEN: INDICATING THE PRESENCE OF THE VIRUS OF VENEREAL LYMPHOGRANULOMA IN THE INTESTINE AND DIFFERENTIATING COLITIS ASSOCIATED WITH THAT VIRUS

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Betty Kravetz baltimore

From the Gastro-Intestinal Section and Laboratories of the Medical Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1937;109(23):1880-1886. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780490018006
Abstract

Idiopathic or nonspecific ulcerative colitis is an involvement of the large intestine, regional or general, of unknown etiology, resulting in an exudate of, or feces containing, blood, mucoblood or pus, or all of them. There was reason to believe that in some cases colitis with or without a stricture might be due to a virus. If this were proved, a virus as a factor in intestinal disease would come into being, and the classification idiopathic ulcerative colitis would be narrowed.

The first step in attempting to demonstrate colitis associated with virus rests, if not in the actual isolation, at least in the indication of the presence of such an agent directly from the region of suspected colonic involvement.

Patients with ulcerative colitis of indeterminate etiology were selected in whom the possible presence of a virus in the colon might be related to the colitis as suggested by their having a

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