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Article
April 30, 1932

THE INTRACAROTID TREATMENT OF MENINGITIS: EXPERIENCES WITH PREGL'S SOLUTION OF IODINE: A FURTHER REPORT

Author Affiliations

DETROIT

From the Neurological Surgical Division of the Henry Ford Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;98(18):1531-1535. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730440011003
Abstract

In two preliminary communications, I1 stated my advocacy of the intracarotid route in the administration of chemical antiseptics or serums in certain cases of meningitis (the stubborn meningococcic and all the purulent), septicemia, and brain abscess. I had been discouraged with my previous attempts to assist surgically in the hopeless cases by subarachnoid drainage through trephine openings to cisternal and lumbar needles. It had seemed more rational to administer the medication into the carotid arteries, thereby assuring the immediate contact of the chemical or serum with the whole of the infected area in relatively undiluted strength. Kolmer2 had just reported some trials on dogs and a few cases in the human being, and the route had been thoroughly tried out in antisyphilitic treatments. He also suggested the use of Pregl's iodine solution3 in the treatment of streptococcic meningitis.

Feb. 5, 1929, I had an opportunity to use

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