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Review
November 8, 2022

Treatment of Hypertension: A Review

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville
  • 2Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
  • 3Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
JAMA. 2022;328(18):1849-1861. doi:10.1001/jama.2022.19590
Abstract

Importance  Hypertension, defined as persistent systolic blood pressure (SBP) at least 130 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) at least 80 mm Hg, affects approximately 116 million adults in the US and more than 1 billion adults worldwide. Hypertension is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and stroke) and death.

Observations  First-line therapy for hypertension is lifestyle modification, including weight loss, healthy dietary pattern that includes low sodium and high potassium intake, physical activity, and moderation or elimination of alcohol consumption. The BP-lowering effects of individual lifestyle components are partially additive and enhance the efficacy of pharmacologic therapy. The decision to initiate antihypertensive medication should be based on the level of BP and the presence of high atherosclerotic CVD risk. First-line drug therapy for hypertension consists of a thiazide or thiazidelike diuretic such as hydrochlorothiazide or chlorthalidone, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker such as enalapril or candesartan, and a calcium channel blocker such as amlodipine and should be titrated according to office and home SBP/DBP levels to achieve in most people an SBP/DBP target (<130/80 mm Hg for adults <65 years and SBP <130 mm Hg in adults ≥65 years). Randomized clinical trials have established the efficacy of BP lowering to reduce the risk of CVD morbidity and mortality. An SBP reduction of 10 mm Hg decreases risk of CVD events by approximately 20% to 30%. Despite the benefits of BP control, only 44% of US adults with hypertension have their SBP/DBP controlled to less than 140/90 mm Hg.

Conclusions and Relevance  Hypertension affects approximately 116 million adults in the US and more than 1 billion adults worldwide and is a leading cause of CVD morbidity and mortality. First-line therapy for hypertension is lifestyle modification, consisting of weight loss, dietary sodium reduction and potassium supplementation, healthy dietary pattern, physical activity, and limited alcohol consumption. When drug therapy is required, first-line therapies are thiazide or thiazidelike diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blockers, and calcium channel blockers.

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