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February 19, 1938

RECOVERY FROM GONORRHEAL ENDOCARDITIS AFTER ARTIFICIAL HYPERPYREXIA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Chief of the Department of Internal Medicine, Harper Hospital; Assistant Surgeon, Outpatient Department DETROIT

From Harper Hospital.

JAMA. 1938;110(8):549-552. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790080007002
Abstract

Gonorrheal endocarditis has long been recognized as a complication of gonorrhea. The gonococcus not only is the causative agent of gonorrhea in the genito-urinary tract but can invade the blood stream to produce arthritis, synovitis, myositis, pericarditis, myocarditis and endocarditis.

The frequency of cardiac complications of gonorrhea cannot be definitely stated, but they are relatively rare considering the universal prevalence of the disease. The literature surveyed by Thayer1 in 1922, Hoffman and Taggart2 in 1932, Kirkland3 in 1932 and Eric Stone4 in 1934 covers a total of 123 cases. Since 1934 sixteen more cases5 have been reported in the literature.

According to the criteria generally accepted, a patient proved to have gonorrheal endocarditis must have a positive blood culture in vivo or a positive culture or smear from the vegetations at necropsy. We find only 108 proved cases in the 139 reported. In the remainder we assume that the diagnosis was presumptive, probable or possible.

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