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March 26, 1938

NERVE INJURIES CAUSED BY INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF DEXTROSE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Attending Neurologist, Cook County Hospital

From the neurological services of the University of Illinois College of Medicine and the Cook County Hospital.

JAMA. 1938;110(13):948-949. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790130008003
Abstract

The chief possible dangers of intravenous infusion, according to Orr,1 are immediate reactions with chills and fever; overburdening of the circulatory system by a rapid increase in blood volume; production of general edema and edema of the lungs; thrombosis at the site of intravenous injection with embolism, and possible increase in dehydration by the use of hypertonic solutions. To the foregoing factors must be added complications from intravenous injections of solutions of dextrose.

Six cases of injuries to the large nerve trunks (especially the median) of the upper extremities were observed by me at the outpatient neurologic clinic of the Cook County Hospital during a period of eight months; all were caused by intravenous injections of dextrose.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  A Negro, aged 40, who entered one of the surgical services of the Cook County Hospital Oct. 9, 1936, because of a "low grade intestinal obstruction," received

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