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Article
June 4, 1932

TREATMENT OF RHEUMATIC FEVER PATIENTS WITH AND WITHOUT SALICYLATES: A CLINICAL AND ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Service of Dr. Leo Kessel, and the Cardiographic Department, the Mount Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;98(23):1978-1980. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730490024007
Abstract

Competent investigators1 have shown that the salicylates are not specific in rheumatic fever but rather that they are merely extremely efficient analgesics and antipyretics for this disease. There is still, however, a belief that the salicylates prevent cardiac complications and shorten the duration of the illness. In a study of fifteen patients, Hanzlik2 found that salicylates shortened the hospital stay and stated that the sequelae of pericarditis and effusions appear to be less and that the general circulatory result is better than without treatment. White3 states that if the salicylates are used, much heart disease can be averted. Levy and Turner,4 using the electrocardiogram, found that salicylates improved faulty conduction between the auricles and the ventricles. To such an extent has this feeling progressed that Kerley5 advises its administration to children predisposed to heart disease, and Epstein6 recommends its routine use in the form

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