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Article
June 4, 1932

DR. BOOT'S NONSURGICAL TREATMENT FOR SWALLOWED FOREIGN BODIES: (A POSTHUMOUS REPORT ON THE METHOD)

Author Affiliations

Evanston, Ill.

From the Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1932;98(23):1981. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27320490002008a

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Abstract

On Sept. 1, 1927, Mary J., aged 7 years, accidentally swallowed a twenty-five cent piece (quarter-dollar). Its passage into the stomach was accompanied by much discomfort and pain. The pain was most intense below the sternum. After the coin passed the cardia, relief was instantaneous. Fluoroscopic examination about two hours later showed the coin in the fundus of the stomach. As there were no symptoms, I asked the mother to notify me if any distressing symptoms arose; otherwise, to report when the coin was passed. Three days later, fluoroscopic examination showed that the coin had not left the fundus. There were no symptoms. The child had eaten three hearty meals each day and had had a daily evacuation. Six days after the accident, the coin was still in the fundus. Nine days after the accident, fluoroscopic examination showed the coin still in the fundus. The mother was now quite concerned

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