[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
April 30, 1938

THE STUDY OF DISEASE AMONG BRITISH POST OFFICE EMPLOYEES

JAMA. 1938;110(18):1492-1493. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790180080015
Abstract

Observations based on the 260,000 employees of all ages and varied activities of the English post office system enabled Bashford1 to present convincing evidence of the reciprocal dependence of industry and medicine. The post office is unique in that there is in England no other body of industrial workers of anything approaching its size that has accurate sick records analyzed yearly in terms of occupational groups and geographic distribution. The records date from the middle of the last century and hence lend themselves readily to a certain type of study.

The incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis in this group compares favorably with that in the community at large and during the last twenty years has shown a steady downward trend. In an analysis of 3,755 cases observed over the last twenty years, it was found consistently that in only 50 per cent of all new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis was

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×