[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 18, 1932

HOOKWORM DISEASE IN WHITE SCHOOL CHILDREN: COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS OF SURVEY

Author Affiliations

WINTER PARK, FLA.

JAMA. 1932;98(25):2189-2190. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730510015004

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

It is rather generally acknowledged that a microscopic examination should precede treatment in all cases of hookworm disease. This view is based on sound experience and sound theory. The microscopic examination is especially important if carbon tetrachloride is to be used in treatment, for if the case is complicated with Ascaris infection, the clinician should know this fact before treatment is instituted.

Opinion is perhaps not nearly so unanimous as to whether one is justified in drawing conclusions regarding the status of hookworm disease on the basis of symptoms observed in a brief inspection of school children unless the diagnosis is made and confirmed in the individual cases by microscopic examination. My position in this matter is that any person experienced in the clinical side of this infection is thoroughly justified by a brief inspection (sometimes referred to as "street car diagnosis") of white children in arriving at conclusions as

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×