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Article
June 18, 1932

SPECIFIC IMMUNOTRANSFUSION IN THE TREATMENT OF SEPTICEMIA: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Division of Pathology and Clinical Pathology of the Laboratories of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;98(25):2191-2193. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730510017005
Abstract

The treatment of septicemia is frequently attended with great difficulties. Physicians often clamor for something specific and fall victims to many of the newer chemicals alleged to be of value in combating infections of the blood stream. In 1919, Sir Almroth Wright1 pointed out several important principles in the treatment of septicemia: First, that adequate surgical drainage of infected foci is extremely important. Second, that it is possible to produce nonspecific bactericidal agents by inoculating blood in vivo or in vitro with different types of killed organisms; that such blood, from six to eight hours after the vaccination, has definite curative effects in many types of infections of the blood stream. Third, that specific immunization is of even greater value than the nonspecific procedures noted. Fourth, that ordinary blood transfusions may actually do harm in infections of the blood stream. He reported a case of septicemia treated with nonspecific

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