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Article
June 18, 1932

THE RÔLE OF ALCOHOL IN THE ETIOLOGY OF NEPHRITIS

JAMA. 1932;98(25):2213-2214. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730510039013
Abstract

Among the cherished traditions of propagandistic hygiene is the devastating effect of alcohol on the heart, blood vessels and kidneys, a view that still lingers in many medical treatises. Those pathologists who study the remains of an alcoholic clientele have generally failed to find in the wrecks of drunkards anatomic evidence that alcohol is a poison that selects the circulatory system for its attack, but rather the opposite. As for chronic nephritis, there seems to be more tradition than proof indicating that it results from chronic alcoholism. In the older literature, Senator maintained the relationship of alcohol to nephritis, quoting English authors who said that at least three fourths of all cases of chronic nephritis depend on alcoholism. More recently Herxheimer, Löhlein and Bertholet have supported the view of the etiologic importance of alcohol in nephritis. On the other hand, Cohnheim said that although the bodies of most inveterate drunkards

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