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May 14, 1938

MERALGIA PARAESTHETICAA REPORT OF ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY CASES

JAMA. 1938;110(20):1650-1652. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790200018006
Abstract

In 1895 Bernhardt1 directed attention for the first time to a curious condition, marked by numbness, on the anterior and especially on the outer surface of one thigh, which became relatively painful only after prolonged exertion or on pressure on the abnormally sensitive regions. In the cases that he reported there was no history of bouts of pain which occurred spontaneously during rest. Shortly afterward Roth2 gave the disease its formidable title, "meralgia paraesthetica," from the Greek words meros (thigh) and algos (pain). It is our purpose in this paper to review the present status of this disease and to analyze the clinical observations on a series of cases that have been studied under standard conditions for a moderately long time.

MATERIAL  Our study was directed to the records of 150 cases of meralgia paraesthetica observed at the Mayo Clinic. The incidence of this condition among patients observed

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