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Article
June 25, 1932

THE SYMPTOMATOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF STRONGYLOIDES INFECTION

Author Affiliations

Professor of Parasitology, Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine NEW ORLEANS

JAMA. 1932;98(26):2276-2277. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730520018005
Abstract

The relatively frequent occurrence of Strongyloides infection throughout the southern part of the United States and the appearance of patients harboring this infection in clinics in the North call for more careful attention than has been given to this disease in the past. The larvae of the etiologic agent, Strongyloides stercoralis, were discovered in 1876 by Normand1 in the stools of French soldiers who had contracted an uncontrollable diarrhea in Cochin China. At necropsy of five of these patients who succumbed to the diarrhea, delicate parasitic nematodes were recovered from the wall of the ileum and from the biliary and pancreatic ducts. Cases were soon diagnosed and studied by Grassi2 and by Perroncito3 in Italy. Leuckart4 demonstrated that the parasitic and stercoral types in this infection belonged to alternate phases in the life cycle of the same organism, while Durme,5 Ransom6 and Fülleborn7

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