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May 28, 1938

THE "COLD PUNCH" TYPE OF PROSTATIC RESECTION: SIX YEARS OF PROGRESS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Urology, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1938;110(22):1807-1810. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790220009004
Abstract

The principle of removing obstructing prostatic tissue through the urethra by means of a cold, cutting, tubular knife sliding in an outer fenestrated sheath was given its first serious trial in the Young punch.1 The principle was further carried on in the Braasch "median bar excisor."2 For obvious reasons neither instrument was adapted for the removal of substantial amounts of prostatic tissue and neither provided adequate means for hemostasis. The first "cold cutting" resectoscope that overcame these difficulties was the Braasch-Bumpus resectoscope.3

Although a few prostatic resections were done each year for several years previous to 1930, it was not until 1931 that they were done in enough volume at the Mayo Clinic to assume importance. The subsequent rapid rise of this type of surgery has been phenomenal, as is demonstrated by the fact that at the Mayo Clinic in 1931 ninety-nine resections were done on eighty-seven

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