[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
May 28, 1938

THE TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLIC PSYCHOSES WITH BENZEDRINE SULFATE: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

SYRACUSE, N. Y.

From the Syracuse Psychopathic Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry of the Syracuse University College of Medicine, Dr. Harry A. Steckel, director.

JAMA. 1938;110(22):1811-1812. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790220013005
Abstract

Alcohol is recognized to have a depressing effect on the central nervous system.1 It therefore seemed rational to us2 to attempt treatment of psychoses due to intoxication from alcohol with benzedrine sulfate (beta-phenylisopropylamine sulfate), which has been established to have a stimulating effect on the central nervous system.3 Because of the nature of the results it appeared desirable to present this preliminary report.

A series of patients admitted to the Syracuse Psychopathic Hospital in psychotic states brought on by alcohol were subjected to careful physical and mental observation and then given from 10 to 30 mg. of benzedrine sulfate by mouth daily. In a few instances from 10 to 30 mg. of the drug was administered intravenously.4 In all cases the diagnosis was made according to the classification adopted by the American Psychiatric Association.

In an estimation of the influence of the drug in these cases

×