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June 4, 1938

BISEPTATE UTERUS: ADENOCARCINOMA IN ONE UTERINE CAVITY AND A PEDUNCULATED POLYP IN THE OTHER

Author Affiliations

New York Assistant Attending Surgeon and Chief of Surgical Clinic, St. Luke's Hospital

From the Surgical Service, St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1938;110(23):1913-1914. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.62790230001011

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Abstract

Neither biseptate uterus nor adenocarcinoma of the body of the uterus is particularly rare, but a combination of these two conditions together with a pedunculated polyp in the other uterine cavity is a sufficiently unusual condition to justify its being reported. Another reason for reporting this case is to emphasize the necessity for a thorough exploration of the uterine cavity in women who bleed after the menopause, even though the first curettings should reveal a uterine polyp.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  A woman, aged 58, a housewife, seen in the office Nov. 11, 1936, gave a history of having passed through a normal menopause with cessation of menstruation five years previously. Six months before the time of her examination she had first noticed a slight watery vaginal discharge. Four months later this became more profuse, and for the last six weeks it had been definitely bloody. At no time had

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