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Article
July 2, 1932

THE PRESENT STATUS OF VITAMIN B2 (G): HISTORICAL SURVEY

Author Affiliations

FAYETTEVILLE, ARK.

From the Laboratory of Agricultural Chemistry, University of Arkansas.

JAMA. 1932;99(1):26-31. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27410530006008
Abstract

During the last few years it has been definitely established that the dietary factor which McCollum and Kennedy1 in 1916 termed water soluble B, generally recognized as a growth-promoting and appetite stimulating substance, is a mixture of vitamin B or vitamin B1 and G or B2. One of these is relatively thermolabile and has antineuritic and growth-promoting properties; the other is more stable after heating under pressure and also possesses growth-promoting properties and functions in the prevention and cure of pellagra-like symptoms in the rat. The former is also referred to as the antiberiberi, and the latter as the antipellagric vitamin. The nomenclature of these two dietary essentials has not yet been finally settled. The American biochemists have adopted the letter B for the antiberiberi factor and the term G for the antidermatitis vitamin.2 In this communication the term B2, tentatively adopted by the biochemists

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