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June 11, 1938

BENZEDRINE SULFATE: ITS LIMITATIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF THE SPASTIC COLON AND A PHARMACOLOGIC STUDY OF ITS EFFECTS ON THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Departments of Medicine, Roentgenology and Gastrointestinal Research of Michael Reese Hospital.

JAMA. 1938;110(24):1994-1999. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790240018007
Abstract

Since the advent of benzedrine as a useful topical applicant to the nasal mucosa, benzedrine sulfate (benzyl methyl carbinamine sulfate1), by virtue of its central stimulating action, has been exhibited for the relief of so many symptoms and disorders as to become almost a panacea. Such excellent reviews of the literature have already appeared, notably by Wilbur, MacLean and Allen2 and by the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association3 as well as an editorial in the British Medical Journal4 that similar summaries would at this time be wholly supererogatory. Suffice it to say, benzedrine sulfate appears to be of definite value in the treatment of narcolepsy and postencephalitic parkinsonism and, only to a restricted degree in the management of certain mild depressive states and in some cases of chronic exhaustion. Although it has been reported as beneficial in the treatment of orthostatic

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