[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 9, 1938

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE POSITIVE KLINE EXCLUSION TESTUNCONFIRMED BY THE KOLMER OR KAHN TEST

JAMA. 1938;111(2):142-143. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790280032006
Abstract

In 1926 Kline and Young1 published their first report of a microscopic slide precipitation test for the detection of syphilis. In subsequent reports,2 modifications were given which were directed mostly toward the preparation of a more sensitive antigen and more stable antigen emulsion. At present the Kline test is used in two forms: one, with "very sensitive" antigen emulsion, designated as the Kline exclusion test; the other, with a "sensitive" antigen emulsion, designated as the Kline diagnostic test. These tests are easily and rapidly performed, are comparatively inexpensive and require but little equipment.

The Bureau of Bacteriology of the Maryland State Department of Health became interested in the Kline exclusion test while seeking a simple yet reliable screen test, by which to exclude as negative many of the routine specimens submitted for the serodiagnosis of syphilis. Reports in the literature indicated that the Kline exclusion test was highly

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×