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Article
July 16, 1932

CHRONIC SEVERE ASTHMA: A STUDY OF A GROUP OF CASES REQUIRING HOSPITAL TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School BOSTON

JAMA. 1932;99(3):202-204. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740550016004
Abstract

In 1930 and 1931, 132 patients were admitted to the Massachusetts General Hospital because their asthma was severe enough to demand treatment in the wards. They were all difficult cases. Among these patients was a group of twenty-five patients with chronic severe asthma peculiarly resistant to treatment, on whom several observations have been made. Before discussing these cases, however, it is necessary to show the relation of this group to the other types of asthma.

The accompanying table shows the clinical characteristics of all the patients and the groups into which they fall. Extrinsic asthma was a diagnosis made in forty-six patients, or 35 per cent of the 132, chiefly because the history included the story of changes in the symptoms corresponding to changes in the environment or diet. The diagnosis was confirmed by the prompt relief in the hospital, where all but two of these patients were relieved of

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