[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 16, 1938

OSTEOMA OF FRONTAL SINUS AND PENETRATION OF LATERAL VENTRICLE, WITH INTERMITTENT PNEUMOCEPHALUS

Author Affiliations

Albany, N. Y.

From the Department of Surgery of the Albany Medical College.

JAMA. 1938;111(3):239-241. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.72790290001007
Abstract

While some osteomas of the frontal and ethmoidal sinuses may long remain asymptomatic, many others have been observed to cause local pains and headaches. If the bony growth or an associated mucocele bulges into the cranial cavity, corresponding cerebral disturbances may follow. Pneumocephalus has been observed in several patients suffering with these tumors.1 In one of Dr. Cushing's cases (reported by Armitage2) the mucocele had actually penetrated the lateral ventricle. Recently we have studied a similar case, in which the principal complaints were of general convulsions and headaches. Since this situation is apparently uncommon, we have ventured briefly to record our observations.

A. R., a white man, aged 26, a chauffeur, was admitted to the Albany Hospital on Dec. 29, 1936, complaining of convulsive attacks, of generalized headaches and of a noise "like water running" in his head. (He was referred to the medical service of Dr. Thomas

×