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July 16, 1938

FRACTURE OF THE OPTIC CANAL CAUSING OPTIC ATROPHY

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

From the Department of Roentgenology of the University Hospitals.

JAMA. 1938;111(3):241-242. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.72790290003007a
Abstract

Roentgenologic visualization of the optic canal was first described in 1917 by de Kleyn and Stenvers.1 The authors read an article by Rhese2 demonstrating the visualization of the posterior ethmoid cells and the sphenoid sinuses on an oblique roentgenogram of the facial bones. Seeing the reproduction, de Kleyn and Stenvers realized that with slight modification Rhese's position could be utilized to demonstrate the optic canal. During the past few years roentgen technic of the optic canal has been simplified with the aid of excellent localizing devices developed by Pfeiffer3 and by Camp and Gianturco4 which eliminate the measurement of certain angles and various other haphazard elements of the technic.

The indications for roentgen examination of the optic canal are numerous, but the procedure is employed chiefly in primary and secondary diseases of the optic nerve in an attempt to demonstrate either diseased posterior ethmoid cells surrounding

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