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Article
July 23, 1932

THE ISOLATION OF BRUCELLA ABORTUS FROM TONSILS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Radiology of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and Strong Memorial Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;99(4):296-298. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740560022007
Abstract

Undulant fever is now a well established disease of man, but much information is wanting concerning its diagnosis, modes of infection, pathology and treatment. There are those who like to believe that Brucella abortus gains entrance to the body only through wounds, while others prefer to accept the digestive tract as the common channel through which the invasion occurs. Undoubtedly, both routes are vulnerable. Soon after Brucella abortus was discovered in raw cow's milk, Mohler and Traum1 became interested in determining whether the organism was pathogenic for man. They infected guinea-pigs with extracts from fifty-six tonsils and adenoid tissue removed from children who had drunk raw milk. They reported finding typical lesions of the disease in one guinea-pig, from whose liver, spleen and testes Brucella abortus was isolated.

In studying the effect of feeding milk artificially and naturally infected with this organism to calves, the senior author2 observed

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