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Article
July 30, 1932

GALVANIC BURNS OF THE ORAL MUCOSA

Author Affiliations

Pittsburgh

JAMA. 1932;99(5):383-384. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27410570003008a
Abstract

In a recent contribution, Everett S. Lain1 called the attention of American dermatologists to an important and what might appear as a relatively frequent cause of lesions of the oral mucosa.

Three patients have come under my observation recently in whom annoying lesions of the oral mucous membrane disappeared on the removal of amalgam and gold dental fillings and other gold appliances in accordance with the principles outlined by Lain. Each instance can be considered clinically to have been a galvanic burn of the oral mucous membrane.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —Mrs. A. P., aged 28, was examined, March 10, 1930, on account of multiple, recurrent and exquisitely painful ulcers of the oral mucosa, resembling the clinical picture of aphthous stomatitis. The ulcers first appeared about two years before and usually numbered from fifteen to thirty at various times, being always decidedly worse just before her menstrual periods.

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