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September 10, 1938

PHYSICAL THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF FRACTURES

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1938;111(11):1016-1019. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.72790370011009
Abstract

Widespread mechanization of industry, the increase in the employment of machinery in agriculture and the tremendous growth in the use of the automobile have completely changed the fracture picture in the United States in recent years. This change has been in two respects: (1) There has been a great increase in the number of fractures which occur annually; (2) there has been a marked increase in the number of serious fractures. The increase in the number of fractures is traceable to the greater opportunity for suffering trauma likely to cause fracture; the increase in the number of severe fractures is ascribable to the severe damage which results from the type of violence which machinery inflicts. As a consequence of these factors, the frac- fracture problem today must be considered as having two aspects: a medical aspect which includes the recognition, reduction and immobilization of fractures, and an economic aspect which

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