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September 17, 1938

A CONSIDERATION OF PRESENT DAY NEWBORN NURSERY PRACTICE: SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT

JAMA. 1938;111(12):1065-1068. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790380007003
Abstract

Fatal diarrhea of the newborn occurring as a local hospital epidemic has within recent years been reported with increasing frequency.1 In the face of such reports, it is conceivable that present day newborn nursery practices may not protect the infant from the introduction and spread of contagion. The increasing number of reports of such outbreaks justifies this appraisal of the nursery.

The term "newborn nursery" is used to identify that portion of the obstetric floor set aside for the care and common housing of the newborn. This consideration is not directed to any institution in particular but rather at nursery practice in general. This is an evaluation of the average newborn nursery in the average hospital.

The introduction of contagion may occur easily, sometimes obviously and at other times more subtly. The normal flow of traffic frequently is a potent source of danger. There is scarcely any group of

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