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Article
August 13, 1932

HAVERHILL FEVER (ERYTHEMA ARTHRITICUM EPIDEMICUM): A CASE REPORT AND BACTERIOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Pathological Laboratory and the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard) of the Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard University Medical School.

JAMA. 1932;99(7):534-538. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740590014004
Abstract

In January, 1926, Place, Sutton and Willner1 made careful clinical and epidemiologic studies of a group of cases occurring in Haverhill, Mass. The condition they observed in forty-five cases appeared to constitute a definite entity and was called by them "erythema arthriticum epidemicum." The outstanding clinical features of the cases described were (1) the symptoms of an infection, (2) a rash, and (3) a polyarthritis. Onset was sudden and came with or without chills, with fever and malaise and with or without vomiting, intense headache and prostration. Fever in the beginning often reached from 103 to 105 F. and came down usually on the third or fourth day. The period of eruption commenced on the first to the third day of illness, increased for from one to three days, and lasted then from three to seven days. This eruption consisted of dull red, circumscribed, maculopapular lesions from 2 to

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