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October 15, 1938

ANTEPARTUM CARE: CLINICAL LECTURE AT SAN FRANCISCO SESSION

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Maternity Hospital and Barnes Hospital.

JAMA. 1938;111(16):1460-1462. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.72790420002011
Abstract

Although the United States was one of the first countries to develop antepartum care, much yet remains to be done to have such care reach the great majority of the mothers in our land. No better introduction can be given a discussion of antepartum care than to recall the classic statement of Williams concerning this subject, that from a biologic point of view pregnancy and labor represent the highest function of the female reproductive organs and should be regarded as a normal process. However, when one recognizes the marked changes in metabolism during pregnancy and the numerous changes that take place in the expectant mother, the borderline between health and disease is not so distinct as at other times. Derangement so slight as to be of little consequence in ordinary circumstances may readily be the precursor of pathologic conditions which may seriously threaten the life of the mother and her

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