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October 22, 1938

THE INCIDENCE OF OCCUPATIONAL DERMATOSES AND THEIR CAUSES IN THE BASIC INDUSTRIES

Author Affiliations

Medical Director, United States Public Health Service NEW YORK

JAMA. 1938;111(17):1523-1528. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790430007003
Abstract

Of prime importance in the effort to control occupational dermatoses is the knowledge of their incidence and causes. Statistics on this subject have been compiled for many years in certain European countries. In the United States until four years ago such statistics were available only from nine states. Since then, however, there has been a marked increase of interest in this subject, and this year there are twenty-five states which gather statistics and have laws that compensate workers for disabling occupational dermatoses.

INCIDENCE IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES  In England between 1921 and 1929 there was an annual average of 769 cases of compensated occupational dermatosis, or about 56 per cent of all occupational diseases. In the three year period of 1930 to to 1932 inclusive there was an annual average of 1,368 cases of occupational dermatosis, or about 72 per cent of all occupational diseases.1 In 1936 there were 1,771

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