[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.175.121.230. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 20, 1932

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF SO-CALLED LIVER DEATH

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO

From the Departments of Pathology and Surgery, St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;99(8):633-636. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740600025006
Abstract

So-called liver death has been the subject of considerable discussion in recent publications, and numerous observations have been made regarding the clinical course and possible etiology of these unfortunate disasters, which all too frequently follow surgical procedures on the gallbladder and bile tract.

In a recent study of several postoperative deaths in patients suffering from gallbladder disease and coincident hepatic damage of long standing, we1 were struck by a peculiar and constant chain of symptoms and necropsy observations which suggested a pathogenesis for this rather obscure type of liver death.

The first case we2 observed was one of traumatic pulpification of the liver in a boy, aged 16 years, who died eleven days after an accident. The most striking clinical manifestations were oliguria (which progressed to anuria) and uremia associated with hemorrhages from all mucous surfaces. The symptoms were accompanied by a marked retention of blood nitrogen. At

×