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Article
August 27, 1932

THE CRISIS IN PSYCHIATRIC EDUCATION: CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

JAMA. 1932;99(9):703-707. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740610001001
Abstract

During the past year I have had the privilege of conducting an inventory and appraisal of psychiatric teaching facilities as a part of the activities of the Division of Psychiatric Education of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene.1 This work was planned under the direction of an outstanding advisory committee, of which Adolf Meyer is chairman. It is based on actual visits to each school which covered a study of the facilities for psychiatric teaching, with interviews with the teaching staff in psychiatry, the deans and administrative officers, professors of medicine and professors of pediatrics. Additional information showing the attitudes of students and recent graduates has likewise been obtained from many schools. I should like to present a part of the factual data accumulated to date and summarized for the first sixty schools visited. These data, although discouraging in some respects, show that psychiatric education is rapidly developing in

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