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November 26, 1938

TETRALOGY OF FALLOT: REPORT OF A CASE IN A MAN WHO LIVED TO HIS FORTY-FIRST YEAR

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Departments of Medicine, Cook County Hospital and Loyola University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1938;111(22):2000-2003. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790480030008
Abstract

A major congenital anomaly of the heart associated with the development of the bulbus cordis1 is the unusual and rare condition first noted by Peacock2 and later fully described by Fallot.3 The tetralogy of Fallot consists of the combination of an interventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis and insufficiency, dextroposition of the aorta and hypertrophy of the right ventricle. Abbott4 ascribed this combination of lesions, largely on the basis of studies by Keith, to an arrest of development before the eighth week of embryonic life. She5 cited seventy-three cases of the tetralogy in her comprehensive summary of the literature in 1928. The oldest patient in her series was 36 years of age and the average age in the series was 11 years.

The outstanding case of this type in the literature is the report by White and Sprague6 of a noted musician who lived to

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