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Article
September 10, 1932

DEHYDRATION ATTENDANT ON SURGICAL OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Surgery, University of Michigan.

JAMA. 1932;99(11):875-880. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740630001001
Abstract

Water is the principal constituent of the body and is essential to the life and activity of every cell. In conditions of health a person automatically cares for his water needs through response to hunger and thirst; in conditions of disease the water supply is frequently governed by the physician. To care for these important water requirements intelligently requires a knowledge of the water losses and gains under all circumstances connected with disease. This study was undertaken to evaluate the water losses of the body during operation and in the recovery period of four hours after operation.

Water, comprising 70 per cent of the body weight, is ingested in greater amounts than all other substance combined. It is importantly concerned with the excretion of waste products and the dissipation of heat. In health the body holds a fixed amount of water and excretes whatever water is excessive. The study of

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