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Article
September 17, 1932

ADVANCES IN ANESTHESIA FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE ANESTHETIST

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Anesthesia, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1932;99(12):968-971. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740640010003
Abstract

One cannot consider advances in anesthesia from the standpoint of the anesthetist without making at least some reference to older anesthetic agents and to the methods of their administration. Chloroform and mixtures containing chloroform continue to fall more and more into disuse, although from time to time its employment is advocated by those who are skilled in its administration.1 The use of ethyl chloride, other than as an agent for anesthetizing tissue by freezing, has been debated, especially from the standpoint of safety. There are satisfactory ways of inducing anesthesia without ethyl chloride.2

Ether, though still widely used by the open drop or semi-open drop method, is becoming less acceptable when so administered than when it is mixed with the gases. Ether given by rectum is being replaced by tribromethyl alcohol (avertin) or tribromethyl alcohol and amylene hydrate. This seems to be an advance. When anesthesia is produced

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