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Article
September 17, 1932

PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT IN THE COMMON ARTERIAL DISEASES OF THE EXTREMITIES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

From the Department of Surgery, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

JAMA. 1932;99(12):982-986. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740640024006
Abstract

Clinical interest in a given field is usually proportional to its therapeutic possibilities. Consequently, it is not surprising that until recently the common arterial diseases of the extremities have attracted comparatively little attention. Thus one of the leading systems of medicine, in its 600 page volume dealing with diseases of the heart, blood vessels and blood, devotes just four pages to chronic arterial diseases. And thrombo-angiitis obliterans is not even mentioned! With but few exceptions, internists and surgeons have neglected this problem of the common peripheral arterial diseases. Dr. Finney's comment at a surgical clinic that any one can amputate a leg, but that it takes a good physician to save one, has long been true. Yet in the past, investigations of peripheral arterial disease have been chiefly concerned with the end-stages. Attention has been focused on the extremity showing actual or threatened gangrene. Before this time arrives, a certain

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