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January 21, 1939

REGULATION OF THE LEVEL OF CALCIUM IN THE SERUM DURING PREGNANCY

Author Affiliations

GALVESTON, TEXAS

From the John Sealy Memorial Research Laboratory and the Department of Pathological Chemistry, University of Texas School of Medicine.; Virginia B. Duff is Fellow under grants from the Mead-Johnson Company, Evansville, Ind., approved by the Pediatrics Research Council, in support of research in the Department of Pathological Chemistry.

JAMA. 1939;112(3):223-229. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800030033008
Abstract

The maintenance of a uniform level of calcium in the serum was called by Cannon1 an example of physiologic homeostasis. The regulation depends on a combination of factors, chief of which are function of the parathyroid, calcium intake, utilization and excretion, and the availability of a mobilizable calcium reserve.

In considering the subject as it applies to pregnancy it becomes apparent that each of these factors assumes even greater importance than ordinarily; moreover, other relations enter into the picture to make it even more intricate. A significant fact is that the calcium level tends to decline during the later months of pregnancy. The conception that this is related to the withdrawal of calcium for fetal development is only partly tenable; it does not explain, for example, why low values occur in women with a good nutritional history whose mineral intake during pregnancy is more than sufficient to meet both

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