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February 4, 1939

HE EFFECTS OF TUBERCULOPROTEIN: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY

Author Affiliations

DENVER

From the Research Department of the National Jewish Hospital.

JAMA. 1939;112(5):403-408. doi:10.1001/jama.1939.02800050017004
Abstract

More than most other diseases, tuberculosis may be justly classed the disease of striking quantitative relations. Animals may survive large amounts of bacilli for a long time, while extremely small numbers of highly virulent mammalian tubercle bacilli will lead to progressive disease in the normal animal. Besides the variegated pathogenicity, these complicated relations may designate tuberculosis a mosaic disease. On numerous occasions in the past, uncertain and erroneous deductions have resulted when the quantitative relations of so simple a single factor as tubercle bacilli and their products have not been carefully weighed. An obvious basis for the experimental study of tuberculosis appears to be (1) the viable bacilli, (2) products derived from the bacillary bodies and (3) metabolism products, or the substances given off by the bacilli during growth or spontaneous disintegration. Prior to the past decade, the literature was encumbered by conflicting observations as a result of the lack

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