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Article
May 2, 1953

ALLERGIC SKIN REACTION TO PROCAINE AMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations
Stamford, Conn.
JAMA. 1953;152(1):28. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.63690010004007c
Abstract

Procaine amide (Pronestyl) hydrochloride has been used effectively in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias of ventricular origin since Mark and his co-workers1 demonstrated its effectiveness in 1950. They proved that the amide of procaine is hydrolized much less rapidly than is procaine, and that the plasma levels are sustained. Procaine amide hydrochloride is completely absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract. Mark and his co-workers demonstrated the suppression of premature ventricular contractions in man. They also terminated, by the use of this drug, prolonged attacks of ventricular tachycardia in three out of four persons.

The only note of caution sounded early in the usage of this new drug was, "Occasional transient electrocardiographic changes resembling those of quinidine intoxication have been observed with procaine amide hydrochloride and should be interpreted by a cardioologist. Intravenous injection is subject to the danger of hypotensive action; oral administration is not."2 Therefore, until recently procaine

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