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Article
May 9, 1953

JEJUNAL STRICTURE DUE TO INGESTION OF AMMONIA: REPORT OF A CASE COMPLICATED BY SEVERE POTASSIUM DEFICIENCY

Author Affiliations

New York
From the Department of Surgery, New York University Post-Graduate Medical School, and the Fourth Surgical Division of Bellevue Hospital.

JAMA. 1953;152(2):134-136. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.63690020008004d
Abstract

Ingestion of a caustic substance, such as lye or ammonium hydroxide, frequently results in ulcerative esophagitis and esophageal stricture. Although cases occasionally have been reported of pyloric stricture due to alkali poison, in general, gastric lesions more frequently follow ingestion of strong acids than of alkalies.1 Lesions of the small bowel following ingestion of either acid or alkali are rare. Review of the literature disclosed only two cases of jejunal lesions due to alkali poisoning2; both were fatal. No report of a nonfatal case could be found. The case described in the present communication appears to be unique in that a corrosive esophagitis and jejunitis coexisted, with no gross lesion of the stomach or duodenum. Successful resection of a jejunal stricture was accomplished 67 days after ingestion of the poison. In addition, this case is of interest because of the development of a severe, almost fatal potassium deficiency

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