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Article
May 9, 1953

CORTICOTROPIN (ACTH) THERAPY IN GUILLAIN-BARRÉ SYNDROME: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

U.S.A.F.
From the U. S. A. F. Hospital, Fairchild Air Force Base, Fairchild, Wash. Lieutenant Newey is Chief of Medical Service.

JAMA. 1953;152(2):137-139. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.63690020011004f
Abstract

This report presents a case of Guillain-Barré syndrome that responded markedly to intravenous corticotropin (ACTH) therapy. To our knowledge there are only two other reports of the use of corticotropin in this condition at the time of this writing.1

REPORT OF A CASE  A 22-year-old married staff sergeant was admitted to the U. S. Air Force Hospital, at Fairchild, Wash., for the first time on May 26, 1952, complaining of numbness of the extremities. The patient stated on admission that he had been perfectly well until two weeks prior to his admission when he noticed one morning on awakening that there was definite numbness and tingling in the palms of both hands. The following day he noticed numbness of the skin of both feet and ankles; this progressed to just below the knees bilaterally. He also noted definite difficulty in ascending stairs, both because of weakness of the lower

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